Design Technology

Department vision

To contextualise learning with real world application within a professional environment

Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous, and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, students design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. Students learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising, and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth, and well-being of the nation.

Year 7

Year 7

As students start the school, we introduce students to the yearlong big topic of “Safety and Skills” which focuses on introducing the students to a range of skills through the use of different tools and equipment to undertake design and practical tasks following safety procedures and protocols. There are six modules which are undertaken in a rotation through two periods each week.

Rotation 1 – Term 1-3

  • Polymer Project
  • Textiles Project
  • Health, Safety and Hygiene
    • 4 Recipes

Rotation 2 – Term 4-6

  • Timber Project
  • A Home for Everyone – architectural drawing
  • Safety and Storage
    • 4 Recipes

Year 8

Year 8

The yearlong big topic for year 8 is “Sustainability and The Environment” which focuses on introducing the students to all three areas of sustainability and the environment in which we live. During year 8 we begin to introduce our two main strands of curriculum; Designing the Built Environment and Food Preparation and Nutrition, with two 12 week modules and two 6 week career focus modules.

Designing the Built Environment

Food Preparation and Nutrition

The 12 week module is focused on town planning and includes designing a garden village and a residential zone within that village incorporating green technologies

  • To define town planning and its importance in society
  • To explain the impact on stakeholders on town planning
  • To evaluate the "garden village" town planning theory
  • To determine the requirements of a garden village
  • To create a local plan based on a garden village philosophy
  • To justify the design, appearance and materials for the garden village
  • To manufacture a scale model
  • To present final design demonstrating how a client’s needs have been met

 

 

 

 

 

The 12 week module is focused on food provenance with the following areas studied

  • To identify how farming impacts the environment.
  • To identify the farming methods used within the dish.
  • To identify the seasonal fruits and vegetables within the dish.
  • To examine the environmental issues associated with transporting food.
  • To evaluate the impact of food distribution on local and global markets.
  • To demonstrate safe use of harvesting a vegetable and use it within a dish.
  • To examine how primary processing of wheat links to food production.
  • To examine how primary processing of milk links to food production.

 

Career Focus Modules

The two career focus modules are part of the social sustainability element of the big topic and are designed to expose the students to the potential of future opportunities within both the built environment and food industries. The focus is on interior designers and professional chefs, which includes a focus on presentation of food.

 

Year 9

Year 9

In Year 9, the yearlong big topic is “Applied Science” which focuses on the science in both strands of the technology curriculum, Designing the Built Environment and Food Preparation and Nutrition.

Designing the Built Environment

Food Preparation & Nutrition

A 12 week café design project is undertaken in year 9 with a focus on construction science and technology and learning REVIT (an industry standard software)

  • To explain the function of building elements
  • To explore foundation types
  • To assess the suitability of building structure type
  • To recommend material use based on U-Values
  • To analyse different types of sustainable technologies
  • To identify and calculate information required for construction projects
  • To apply calculated information into creating a floor plan proposal
  • To draw 2D plans of a construction design
  • To draw elevations of a construction design
  • To enhance designs with additional features to meet client's needs
  • To present 3D plans of the design proposal using REVIT

A 6 week module will be introduced in academic year 2021/2022 to focus on structural engineering of bridges with a theory and practical challenge task.

 

Food science and nutrition modules are taught with the following areas studied.

  • To explain the functions and properties of the core nutrients (fats, protein and carbohydrates)
  • The function
  • An excess
  • A deficiency
  • To evaluate the impact of different cooking methods on the nutritional and sensory qualities in food.
  • To apply the nutritional needs for different groups of people
  • To adapt a dish suitable for a specific dietary requirements.
  • To examine the different ways fats and oils can be used within cooking.
  • To demonstrate making an emulsion .
  • To demonstrate denaturisation and coagulation of an egg.
  • To demonstrate how fats/oils can be used to shorten carbohydrates.
  • To conducts a scientific experiment on how emulsions work, interpreting the data recorded.
  • To link the results from the experiments to real world examples.
  • To conduct a science experiment on the denaturing of an egg.

 

Year 10

Year 10

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

In year 10, the AQA Food Preparation and Nutrition course will cover the theory content of all five subject areas and student will undertake two practice Non-Exam Assessments. This course is delivered through preparation and making activities and by the end of the course the students will be able to make the connection between theory and practice to apply their understanding of food and nutrition to practical preparation. The five areas of study are:

  1. Food Nutrition and Health
  2. Food Science
  3. Food Safety
  4. Food Choice
  5. Food Provenance

Level 1/2 Designing the Built Environment

This course is taught in three modules and challenges students to design innovative solutions to construction project briefs.

  1. Planning potential of construction projects (25%)
  2. Drawing construction plans (50%)
  3. Building structures and materials (25%)

In Year 10, students study an introductory module in built environment followed by Unit 1 and in term 6 begin the unit 2 work.

Unit 1 is about the planning process. The curriculum covers how land and buildings have different levels of protection that can affect any development plans. As well as the important things that need to be considered to get planning permission for a development project including infrastructure of an area. This involves looking at potential projects, studying the local area and making recommendations to a client about whether they are a likely to get planning permission to build.

Unit 2 is for learners to develop the skills needed to use computer software to present drawings of construction designs. Students will develop hand drawing skills as well as skills to use computer software used by industry. Also, development and application of mathematical techniques to ensure that a proposed building is fit for purpose.

 

Year 11

Year 11

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

In year 11, the focus is on completing the two Non Exam Assessments. The first NEA is a food science investigation with some of the topics recently covered being:

  • Enzymic browning (the process of fruit and veg turning brown)
  • Raising agents (the different types and their effect on certain foods)
  • The function of certain ingredients (butter in pastry)

The second NEA is a longer piece or work from October to February focusing on a research project connected to food choice and nutrition. This section is where you practice cooking a range of different food to fit into the research brief and showcase your skill development and presentation. The culmination of the research project is a 3 hour practical exam where students make and present 3 dishes.

 

Level 1/2 Designing the Built Environment

This course is taught in three modules and challenges students to design innovative solutions to construction project briefs.

  1. Planning potential of construction projects (25%)
  2. Drawing construction plans (50%)
  3. Building structures and materials (25%)

In Year 11 students complete their unit 2 project and the unit 3 module.

Unit 2 is for learners to develop the skills needed to use computer software to present drawings of construction designs. Students will develop hand drawing skills as well as skills to use computer software used by industry. Also, development and application of mathematical techniques to ensure that a proposed building is fit for purpose.

Unit 3 is about linking the knowledge of unit 1 and 2 to review options for the structures and materials need to build the construction projects. Through this unit students learn about different types of materials and structures that are used in buildings. As well as the factors that need to be considered to make the right choices. Sustainable materials and processes used in construction and the effect they have on the operation of a building are also covered within unit 3.

Post 16 at WG6

Professional Construction Practice (PCP) has been developed to create and inspire the next generation of Built Environment professionals. through a project-based approach, PCP applies pure academic subjects to the latest construction industry practices. There is extraordinary support from industry leaders, professional bodies and progressive universities. This is an inspiring programme that is up to date and in demand by industry such as our partners White Code design associates and Laing O’ Rourke. Studying this subject will compliment art, geography and media studies. The course consists of 4 units:

  1. Design the Built Environment
  2. Create the Built Environment
  3. Value and Use the Built Environment
  4. BIM and Construction Projects

Further information can be found on the WG6 website

Assessment

At Key Stage 3 each half term consists of four types of assessment in the module being undertaken, the first is a teacher assessment, followed by a homework, a practical assessment and an end of topic test

 

The GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition course will be assessed by using practice NEA papers and past examination questions, as well as frequent topic assessments to help them practice timed responses. The students undertake a total of 30 hours for NEA work and a 1 hour 45 minutes exam paper at the end of the course

The Designing the Built Environment course is assessed through a 12 hour unit 2 assessment, a 6 hour unit 3 assessment and a 6 hour timed exam. These assessments take place across the two year course with practice questions and full mocks regularly taking place.

Related careers

It is widely noted that the skills learned in Design Technology across the key stages are all highly regarded skills in many careers. The creative arts industry is one of the fastest growing in the country and contributes over £75 billion to the economy, meaning that there are a huge range of careers both at home and abroad that offer a rewarding experience and healthy salary.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/creative-industries-worth-8million-an-hour-to-uk-economy

  • Designer (Fashion, jewellery, product, web, digital and many more)

  • Graphic Designer/advertising executive

  • Architect

  • Landscape/environmental architect

  • Engineer

  • Food technologist

  • Buyer

  • Design Journalist

  • Interior designer

  • Surface designer (wallpaper, fabric etc)

  • Model maker/propmaker

  • Set Designer (film, TV, theatre)

  • Costume designer